info@calamericanhomes.com
909-206-0001

open concept

27
Apr

Is Open Concept Right for You?

When you work with vintage homes, like we do, we come across a lot of old school closed kitchens. These were built when life was a little more formal than we think of it today. For the last 20 or 25 years, a lot of people are deciding that an open-concept kitchen better fits a modern lifestyle. You know why? They can be pretty great!

Open concept kitchens are famous for many things—allowing light to flow through a house, watching the kids as they play and enabling people to hang out when entertaining. These are definite bonuses for some families and houses.

But we also see a lot of reasons to keep the original structure of a closed kitchen. And believe it or not, a lot of people are realizing they prefer the separation from the rest of the house when cooking.

Before buying an old home and tearing down the walls between the kitchen and living areas, take some time to decide what works for you. Here are some things to consider when it comes open concept versus closed kitchens.

 

Storage: When you remove walls, you’re also eliminating storage. That can mean cupboards, pantry space and even countertops where you place appliances and prep food. Without those spaces, do you have enough storage and prep areas?

Costs: Turning a home into open concept isn’t just about removing a wall or two. It also includes plumbing, electrical work, rearranging the large appliances like stoves and refrigerators, and moving cupboards. Oftentimes people choose this time to completely remodel everything and kitchens can cost tens of thousands of dollars. Depending of the extent of the work, you may have to hire an architect, a designer, a contractor and a construction crew. Another thing to keep in mind when talking to professionals about home remodels is if they have your best interest and budget at heart. Or are they just trying to sell you on products and services because let’s be honest—this is how they make money. There are many great professionals who will work within your budget and treat you and your wallet with respect. But like any industry, be careful of who you work with.

Entertaining: We hear this one a lot. “We like to have people over and I want to be able to talk with my guests!” That’s understandable but it doesn’t work for everyone. Some people love chopping veggies and prepping chips and dips while chatting with everyone in the kitchen. But others have trouble multitasking or simply want to concentrate while preparing large meals, like on Thanksgiving. Sometimes guests are more hindrance in these instances. We also know people who like to surprise guests with what they cooked or want a more formal dining experience. It’s different for everyone. In this case, take an honest look at how often you entertain and what floor plan provides the best functionality for daily use.

Privacy: This applies to both entertaining and a daily routine. When you have an open floor plan anyone who drops by can see your dishes sitting in the sink, the mess from lunch you haven’t cleaned up or your pots boiling over. The same goes for entertaining. While it may seem fun in theory to have friends hanging out with you when you’re cooking, even small meals or snacks can make a mess. That includes dirty pots, pans, dishes and utensils—that are now fully on display as people trying to eat.

Odors: Sometimes a good scent wafting through the air is the best invitation to dinner! But other times it’s just annoying for those in the house. Is this something that you want on a daily basis?

Supervising children: One of the biggest concerns people have is making sure their children are safe. Fair enough. We have three small boys so we understand this one. There are a couple of things to consider though. How old are your kids? How long will they need to be supervised and is it worth the cost to reconfigure a house if they only need supervision for a couple of years? Will they be safe in the next room when you can pop your head in whenever you need? And this leads us to …

Noise: When you’re concentrating on cooking, will the noise of the kids playing or watching TV disturb you? Or will your cooking and clanking around the kitchen bug them? This also goes for others in the house, such as teenagers or adults. And it goes for entertaining as well. If your guests are drinking wine and trying to chat with each other, will the noise put a damper on their conversation, which is usually the highlight of a good dinner party.

Architectural integrity: We love historic homes and buildings! If you have a vintage house, consider whether or not the changes look right and fit into the home’s décor and structure. Everything needs to be updated sometimes, but we’ve walked into houses where modern “remodeling” looks out of place or downright jarring. For those of us who love vintage charm, modernization can kill some very cool character. When you remodel a property with a distinctive or historical look, if you don’t stick to it the updates simply don’t look right. And this is something no one ever talks about: That new modern kitchen will be out of style in a few years anyway. Now you’re stuck with an architecturally ill-suited kitchen that will only need remodeling in a few years anyway. Keeping a unique or distinctive look of a kitchen never goes out of style.

What’s Right for You? Every family and home is unique. Ignore trends when it comes making big, permanent changes to your house. Think about what functions best for you on a daily basis to make your house as happy and efficient as possible. Also think about what your needs will be in the future. We don’t want to suggest something that doesn’t work for your family or make you feel like you’ve been strong-armed into anything you don’t want. Just the opposite! Hopefully, this list helps serve as a guide before making serious commitments of time, effort and money.

16
Jun

Eichler 101

The term “Eichler” has become practically synonymous with Mid-century Modern houses in California. More than 11,000 Eichler houses were built in California between the late 1940s and mid-1960s, with the highest concentration in Northern California. But here in Southern California, Eichler neighborhoods in such cities as Orange and Granada Hills are still hot properties for folks who like sleek, modern design.

The name “Eichler” actually derives from the developer, Joseph Eichler, a businessman whose architectural aesthetic was said to be inspired by living in a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed house. After World War II, returning soldiers and the following baby boom increased the demand for middleclass housing. Eichler’s houses contrasted with most of the other tract houses going up during that era—usually boxy traditional or ranch-style houses. The modern houses simply became known as “Eichlers” because of their unique architecture.

Eichlers are best known for blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor living. Floor-to-ceiling windows and sliding glass doors all but make walls invisible and flood houses with natural light. The floor plans are typically U-shaped, forming an open-air atrium in the center of the home. The genius of the houses’ layouts is that despite all the large windows, there are few if any windows in the front so it’s completely private from the street.

So what are the characteristics of Eichler houses and why are they so different? Here’s a brief list of some of the most notable Eichler features.

s1e8_floor_ciel_windows

Floor-to-ceiling windows

s1e8_sliding_glass_door

Sliding glass doors

s1e8_atrium

Atriums or courtyards

s1e8_post&beam

Post-and-beam construction

s1e8_mohagany

Mahogany paneling

s1e8_lowslope

Low-sloped roof

s1e8_openfloorplan

Open floor plans

s1e8_radiant

Radiant heating for the floor

To see the transformation of an Eichler home in Orange, CA, click here!